Frequently Asked Questions2018-09-05T04:48:13+02:00
Can I get my Master’s in England while playing volleyball there?2017-10-31T01:51:41+02:00

England and the Student-Athlete – After the success of the 2012 London Olympics, Universities in England have invested heavily in their facilities, and performance sport programs have become more common place.

Universities want to attract high quality student-athletes (Europeans too!) to build and develop these programs. Part of their recruitment packages include partial to full scholarships for postgrads (Masters and PhDs) and undergrad students. English Universities’ scholarships are in relation to tuition fees, so costs such as room, board, visa, flight, insurance, etc are normally paid by the student. There are no “free rides” within the English university system like in USA.

Undergrad degrees are three years and cost $12-18,000 tuition per year; Masters are one year and cost between $12,000 and $20,000. Phd’s are between three and seven years, and approximately cost $20,000 per year. Costs will vary by universities and by degree.

The commitment required and the level of local players is lower and most of the programs are under six years old so don’t expect a D1 student-athlete experience. However the quality of play and coaching is improving each year and you will have time to travel (with four major airports, thereare heaps of cheap flights to basically everywhere in Europe).

Degree options and scholarships vary depending on the school. Many players choose this route to satisfy their quench for an overseas living/volley experience while using their brains to get a cheaper Master’s degree. Beach volley scholarships are also possible. BIP has visited a number of universities in person, meeting the coaches and seeing the cities and campuses to sort out which have the best experience for study/volley/life abroad, + scholarship possibilities.

1. What is an Exposure Tour & how can it help me sign a professional contract?2017-10-30T17:25:33+02:00

BIP hosts Exposure Tours throughout Europe at strategic times throughout the year to help players find teams to play for. Each Exposure Tour comprises a group of individual players that sign up to train and play against European club teams together (typically without knowing one another upon arrival) with the goal of learning what professional volleyball is really all about, and often with the hope of receiving a contract with a team by the end of the tour.

The primary goal of every Exposure Tour is to get players as much as exposure to professional coaches, managers and scouts as possible while touring beautiful cities in Europe and educating players on the differences in international volleyball leagues throughout the world and understanding what its really like to accept a contract and decide to live in another part of the world.

During the tour we LiveStream practices and matches to increase exposure for players while improving the chances of signing a professional contract.

Exposure Tours also offer players the opportunity to meet veteran players and European coaches to learn more about what life as a professional volleyball player in Europe is really like. We’ve found that the players who come on Exposure Tours are more likely to complete a successful European season as a result of their learning from tour. Every year we have players that come on our Exposure Tours and turn down club contracts because after being on tour they learn that playing volleyball in Europe is not for them.

For many, Exposure Tours are the ticket to a professional career overseas and for others, it will provide a positive closure to a career. In either case, playing in Europe on an Exposure Tour provides players a valuable education.

2. When are the annual Exposure Tours?2017-10-27T18:22:05+02:00

Our two most popular and successful Exposure Tours are the annual January European Exposure Tour (Women) and the August Fire Sale (From 2018, this too will be Women only). Because the European volleyball season starts in September and typically ends in April or May, European teams usually sign foreign players during 3 periods:

April/May: Organized teams will often sign experienced players or resign current players when the season is over. Then they break for summer and there is often little signing action during June and July

August: Prior to the start of the season, many rookies or 1st time players get signed. This period can extend into September as many leagues in Europe are starting later in the year due to economic issues.

January: This is the beginning of the 2nd half of the season, and many teams hire players to replace injured or pregnant players from the first half, or to beef up in preparation for playoffs.

This calendar is why we host our two Exposure tours in January and August.

3. Am I guaranteed to get a contract if I go on an Exposure Tour?2017-10-27T18:21:08+02:00

Although we can never guarantee a contract with a professional club because of coming on an Exposure tour, we typically find teams for most players on our Exposure Tours that come to Europe to stay. You can read through past Exposure Tour Journals and Results to see the number of signings from past tours. Our record speaks for itself.

4. Will my experience and college career influence my ability to get a contract offer with a professional team?2017-10-27T18:19:53+02:00

Having played NCAA volleyball doesn’t always help one figure out how they will perform internationally. The systems, coaching styles and resources are completely different. Being able to perform in practice and in games is important, but it’s not everything. Professional clubs also measure your ability to be a great teammate and connect with the fan base in the local community.

Here’s the most important questions to ask yourself as an attacker:

  • Can you attack from 3 meters and score?
  • Can you be an effective server and defender playing in all 6 rotations?
  • Did you have experience playing backrow?
  • Are you comfortable attacking from both zone 1 and zone 6?
  • Can you contribute on defense?
  • Can you score points on your serve?

Here’s some important questions to ask yourself about living abroad:

  • Do you love being in Europe?
  • Are you willing to learn a new language?
  • Are you open to adjusting to a different culture?
  • Will you be able to emotionally handle a significant amount of time alone or around people who do not speak your native language?
5. Is it possible to get signed before the tour?2017-10-27T18:18:42+02:00

It happens, but many teams want to wait and see how someone does in the European environment first. They pay a lot of money to sign someone (fees, Visa, plane tickets, etc.) and since they just can’t tell enough from college video, many wait for the tour. Keep in mind that 100+ teams watch the tour on LiveStream. We stream practices and matches, and so while only 10-20 coaches or managers (or our agent partners from other countries) might be on tour, you’re being seen by people from all over the world.

6. What should I expect in practice and matches during the tour?2017-10-27T18:16:38+02:00

During the tour, you will have 2 volleyball sessions on most days. One may be a practice and will likely be a match against a local European team. You will learn to warm up in the European style, be coached by a European coach and train with other Americans, Canadians or other Bring It clients who you haven’t played with before.

7. Should I list more than one position?2017-10-27T18:17:08+02:00

If you are capable of playing more than one position well, then you can be more desirable for teams. We strive to market you to the broadest possible audience.

This tour is not the time to try-out for another position that you haven’t played since high school. However, if you feel comfortable and strong switching positions then you should list multiple positions to showcase your skills.

  • Options for positions are as follows:
  • Opposite (Must be able to play all the way around to hit out of back row)
  • Middle hitter (Must be able to serve.)
  • Outside hitter (Must be able to play 6 rotations and receive serve.)
  • Setter
  • Libero (Note that it is very difficult to place liberos in Europe and there is no such thing as DS in international play.)
8. What happens if I get a contract?2017-10-27T18:17:15+02:00

If you receive an offer from a team then your agent will notify you and explain the terms the terms of the contract. Ultimately the decision is always up to you whether you want to accept the contract. There is very little negotiating room on the contracts delivered by the teams.

If you choose to accept an offer, then you will leave the tour relatively quickly to join the signing team in their city and start training. The team will provide transportation for you to leave the tour. They will also provide all room and board for the remainder of the tour and until the terms of your contract start. Your agent will guide you through this process.

9. Can I travel before or after the Exposure Tour?2017-10-27T18:17:23+02:00

Absolutely! We encourage you to travel in Europe either before or after the tour if possible. Many athletes have received contract offers after the tour ends so staying a week or two to travel on your own could be helpful. However, BIP does not plan or pay for any additional travel outside of the Exposure Tour dates.

10. How do I pack for a trip that could last as short as 10 days or up to 8 months?2017-10-30T17:18:29+02:00

Our best advice is to only take what you can carry through the airport by yourself regardless of how long you stay. Most European teams will not have athletic trainers accessible, therefore we strongly recommend using ankle braces rather than taping ankles. Otherwise we recommend brining the basic items that you’ll need for a tour in Europe. Click here to read BIP’s Ultimate Packing List for Europe.

Keep in mind that you will be able to buy things in Europe. You will take things home at the holidays and bring different things back. Most U.S. products can be found in Europe and you are likely to find new ones that don’t exist in the States.

11. How much money should I bring on tour?2017-10-27T18:17:41+02:00

Most countries we travel in on tour operate on the currency of Euros. The best way to get Euros is to bring a debit or credit card that doesn’t charge you to use it in Europe or has no ATM withdrawal fees. Use the ATM machine at the airport or any bank you see to get some cash out. Be sure to notify your bank that you will be traveling before leaving the US or else the bank is likely to freeze your card after your first foreign transaction. We do not recommend bringing a ton of cash for safety reasons. Pick pocketing is common throughout Europe, especially on the trains and during peak tourism seasons in the big cities.

12. What do I need in preparation for tour?2017-10-27T18:17:49+02:00

Prior to coming on an Exposure Tour will need to submit your CV and a full match video for our agents to promote you and add you to the player list on our website. You can view the list of female players here and mens players here.

13. Do you offer financial aid?2017-10-27T18:17:58+02:00

Unfortunately, no.  Many players pay for the tour out of pocket, but we have had many girls set up a “GoFundMe” account or found sponsors through their alma mater booster club.

14. How do I sign up for an Exposure Tour?2017-10-27T18:18:06+02:00

If you want to sign up or learn more about one of our upcoming European Exposure Tours, just contact us here. Be sure to include your name and specify that you are interested in joining an exposure tour.

1. What does it mean to be represented by Bring It Promotions?2017-10-27T18:03:13+02:00

Bring It Promotions is not a formal, cutthroat professional agency like you’d see in Jerry McGuire. We don’t actively solicit clients by calling all the time or sending fancy gifts. We don’t work that way because professional volleyball doesn’t work that way. Nonetheless, we are a full-service agency that matches players with teams, negotiates contracts, interacts with international federations, and, in a few cases seeks out marketing and advertising opportunities for clients. In general, what we have to offer really just depends on your level, your willingness to travel, and what contract terms you’re willing to accept as a foreign volleyball player.

2. I am a National Team member, a Division I collegiate All-American, and/or I was involved with the National Team development pipeline. What can BIP do for me?2017-10-30T17:41:51+02:00

Bring It Promotions assists players with professional career development and international team placements after college. BIP can find the best professional playing environment for you both financially and geographically to ensure that you are getting the most out of your foreign professional experience while competing at the highest possible level. We not only find you a team and negotiate on your behalf, but also remain accessible to you throughout your contract. Players of your caliber can earn significant amounts of money playing in foreign leagues and can be placed on good teams in competitive countries. In most cases you will be one of the premier players—if not the premier player—on your team. The workload and level of expectation is higher, of course, but there can be rewards for hard work.

Additionally, National Team players can utilize Bring It Promotions even if you are not playing overseas. At your request, we can handle negotiations directly with the US Volleyball Federation on your behalf, keep you abreast of potential future deals in foreign countries, introduce you to some of the world’s top division coaches and team managers, and begin marketing you for the future. Finally, when foreign teams need short-term players (occasional two-week to one-month stints) to qualify for a tournament or to remain in their country’s top division, they are often willing to pay a decent salary for a “quick fix” player. BIP will inform you of all such opportunities to earn extra money, especially when those scenarios arise during National Team off-seasons.

3. I am not a National Team member or Division I collegiate All-American. Can I BIP still help me?2017-10-27T18:01:45+02:00

Yes! It is completely possible to a successful professional career even if you were not a Division I All-American or National Team member. We strive to treat all of our players equally and find the right team match for every player we represent. We will work to find you a team, negotiate on your behalf and remain accessible to you throughout the duration of your season.

However to get signed with a professional team in Europe, we strongly encourage you to attend one of our Exposure Tours in either January or August. This is especially crucial for non National Team members and Division I All-Americans. You can read player tour journals from past tours here.

4. Will Bring It Promotions represent non-American clients?2017-10-27T17:59:10+02:00

Yes! Bring It Promotions has represented both male and female National Team and top-level players from over 25 different countries over the years. As is the case with USA National Team members, we will negotiate on your behalf with foreign contracts, but also with your home federation at your request.

5. If I sign up with Bring It Promotions as my agency, how long am I committed to the company?2017-10-27T17:57:34+02:00

Our standard Player Representation Agreement (PRA) is referred to as a “1+1” contract, meaning that if you sign a contract with a professional team, your Player Representation Agreement with BIP automatically rolls over to include the following year; essentially a 2-year agreement. We like to have longer term agreements with players to promote loyalty and a more connected relationship, but are willing to work with athletes in a manger that makes them feel comfortable.

1. How does the level in Europe compare with the rest of the world?2017-10-27T17:54:51+02:00

It should first be noted that the highest levels of professional volleyball are not exclusive to Western Europe. In fact, China, Korea, Japan, and Brazil have some of the best and highest paying teams in the world. Within Europe, Italy is still generally considered the best league (from top to bottom) although there are leagues like Turkey with higher salaries and some of the top teams in the world.

Historically, Russia, Poland, Azerbaijan, and Turkey are good and often very high-paying leagues. However, Russia has moved away from hiring Americans and Azerbaijan is in shambles due to financial issues. Poland also lost a lot of money in 2016 and salaries have been slashed. Other European Cup teams from the most competitive counties can be on par with these tops teams as well, but the reality is that level of volleyball and financial power of professional club teams around the world is constantly changing.

Common places for Americans include France, Spain, Germany, and Italy A2 but the top teams from these countries might compete at the highest level on any given year.

It’s important to note that top league teams in Germany, France, Finland and Switzerland are well organized leagues offering a good life off the court, decent crowds (at least the top teams), and both Germany and France can be very competitive to get into as players are well treated with payments normally coming on time.

Teams in Sweden, Denmark, Iceland and Norway also hire a lot of Americans these days, but cost of living can be high and salaries aren’t quite as high as places like Finland and Switzerland for example. These are great starter leagues for rookies, but players need to be ready for an experience both on and off the court and not sign up thinking that they’ll be on a great team.

Greece and Spain are both leagues with long histories, but also a time of decline since the recession in Europe. Both are coming back, and there are several good teams in both countries. Cyprus is also proving to be a good experience and nice place to play around the same level.

Holland, Belgium, and Luxembourg hired a lot of Americans in the 90’s and early 2000’s, but due to Visa restrictions and EU Law regarding immigration, it’s much less common these days to find a team able to hire in this area.

Most countries have lower division leagues, but the level of these are hard to define. Turkey’s A2 has some teams paying 6-figures and others with a fairly low level. Germany and France both have teams in both D2 and D3 that can pay decent salaries, but level fluctuates wildly. It would be cumbersome to attempt to define all levels of all leagues here, especially as so many teams/leagues experiences change almost annually.

There are also leagues or short term playing opportunities, often with different time frames for their seasons, in places like Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand, Puerto Rico, certain Arab Countries (UAE, Kuwait, Qatar, etc), Argentina, Chile, Peru, and even the Maldives. Level, compensation, and time of year really vary year to year with these countries.

Philippines has a three month league based in Manila with about eight teams and continues to grow. All matches are played in one or two arenas in Manila. League and pre-season starts in January or February and ends in April. Each team is allowed to sign two foreigners to strengthen their roster. The money here can be much higher per month than in Europe for a first-year pro and even a veteran player with multiple years experience in Europe. The training schedule is not as strenuous as a typical European team with a comparable salary. Most teams in the Philippians train once per day and receive more free days. Matches are played in big arenas in front of thousands of fans, as women’s volley is a popular sport in the Philippines. The league now runs from January to May.

Puerto Rico has become an ideal “transition league” for NCAA stars as the teams sign just as the NCAA season ends and the league runs from January to May. The money dropped quite a bit after the island went “bankrupt” in 2017, but many of the players that sign in Puerto Rico stil make more in salary than they would in Europe, and without having to travel as far.

England and the Student-Athlete – After the success of the 2012 London Olympics, Universities in England have invested heavily in their facilities, and performance sport programs have become more common place.

Universities want to attract high quality student-athletes (Europeans too!) to build and develop these programs. Part of their recruitment packages include partial to full scholarships for postgrads (Masters and PhDs) and undergrad students. English Universities’ scholarships are in relation to tuition fees, so costs such as room, board, visa, flight, insurance, etc are normally paid by the student. There are no “free rides” within the English university system like in USA.

Undergrad degrees are three years and cost $12-18,000 tuition per year; Masters are one year and cost between $12,000 and $20,000. Phd’s are between three and seven years, and approximately cost $20,000 per year. Costs will vary by universities and by degree.

The commitment required and the level of local players is lower and most of the programs are under six years old so don’t expect a D1 student-athlete experience. However the quality of play and coaching is improving each year and you will have time to travel (with four major airports, thereare heaps of cheap flights to basically everywhere in Europe).

Degree options and scholarships vary depending on the school.Many players choose this route to satisfy their quench for an overseas living/volley experience while using their brains to get a cheaper Master’s degree. Beach volley scholarships are also possible. BIP has visited a number of universities in person, meeting the coaches and seeing the cities and campuses to sort out which have the best experience for study/volley/life abroad, + scholarship possibilities.

Its worth notice that some teams offer more of an “Experience Job” than a “Volleyball Job”, and this distinction is important to note for mid- and lower-level players. A top national team player will end up on a team that trains well and often, has good infrastructure and coaching, and will be more dedicated to working hard, improving, and truly be a “professional athlete’, embracing the life that this requires. A player earning $1000/month in D2 France or Sweden (for example) may only train 4 times/week and should be ready for a much less professional life; focusing instead on really enjoying the experience of living in Europe, and using the opportunity to play as a means to this end.

2. How does the level of volleyball in Europe compare to collegiate volleyball in the United States?2017-10-27T17:52:53+02:00

Professional leagues in Europe are not necessarily a vertical step up from college. European professional teams are often less organized and have fewer resources most universities in the United States. Depending on where you go, the training may or may not be as strenuous as your collegiate training. Suffice it to say, however, that if you play on or against teams in Champions League or CEV team, the level of intensity will at least match the level of intensity of any top school in the US. And remember, although the training may not always be as intense, the caliber of players is unquestionably higher and more experienced.

3. What’s the difference between Champions League, CEV Cup, and CEV Challenge Cup?2017-10-27T17:52:12+02:00

The top countries throughout Europe play in multi-country playoff tournaments to determine the best teams in all of Europe for any given year. Champions League, CEV Cup, and CEV Challenge Cup are international, cream-of-the-crop tournaments.

Champions League is the highest-level tournament consisting of the top team from most of the best countries.

CEV Cup and CEV Challenge Cup are separate tournaments, which usually consist of the second to fourth or fifth place teams from the top countries. Some wealthier, more competitive teams from second tier countries also travel to play in these tournaments if they qualify.

Landing spots on European Cup teams can be challenging, even for US National Team members, collegiate All-Americans, or National Team development players.

4. When is the European volleyball season?2017-10-27T17:51:28+02:00

The typical European season begins sometime between August and October and ends sometime between March and May. The duration of the season depends entirely on the country, the team, and the playoff schedule for the particular league.

5. What is a typical practice and playing schedule for a professional European team?2017-10-27T17:50:51+02:00

The number of times you practice in any given week depends on the country, the team, and the division in which you play. Many highly competitive European teams practice twice a day and compete at least once each weekend. Other mid- to lower-level teams practice three to four times each week and compete once on the weekends.

6. Will my coaches or teammates speak English?2017-10-27T17:50:21+02:00

In many cases the answer is no. It is common for the coaches to speak little to no English, but there are almost always players on the team can speak English. Language tutors are also available in many cities. As part of the European assimilation process, you should want to learn at least the basics of the language that is spoken around you.

7. How many foreign players can play on a team, and what is the likelihood of another American playing with me?2017-10-27T17:49:42+02:00

Normally, two or three foreign players are permitted on any one team. There are countries, however, that have an unlimited number of foreign spots. Examples include: Austria, Holland, Germany and Switzerland; Switzerland now requires 2 Swiss players on court at all times, not including libero. Spain can have 6 foreigners and Portugal permits up to 5. Finland can have 3. France must have a certain amount of French players and only two foreigners from out of the “Euro-Zone”. The rules fluctuate every few years, and differ in each country and league, so please ask us if you have questions about a certain league. It is not uncommon to have two Americans on the same team (or more), and BIP tries to place Americans together whenever possible. Of course such a scenario is not guaranteed.

Due to these foreigner rules, teams sign pro players not solely to fill roster spots but because they need better players than they already have. Remember that a local athlete may play for peanuts compared to a “pro” that costs at least $5000 in fees alone (Visa, Transfers, etc.), not to mention salary, apartment, etc.

In Puerto Rico, teams were allowed 2 foreigners in 2017, but the owners voted to move to 4 foreigners in 2018 as another example as to how hard it can be to keep track of all of these foreigner rules.

8. How much can I make playing in Europe?2017-10-27T17:48:32+02:00

Your salary depends on your skill level, the location, and the financial capabilities of the team. Professional contracts can range from a few hundred US dollars to $10,000 a month or more. Some contracts also include signing bonuses and performance-based incentives packages for wins. It is important to keep in mind that, aside from the very best, world-class players, salaries have dropped as a whole from previous years. You may have to get used to the idea that your first year salary may be far lower than what your friends made in their first seasons a couple of years ago. On the upside, however, the money you make playing professionally in Europe is normally tax free, rent free, and insurance free, so if you are contracted to earn $1000 USD per month, that’s exactly how much you will be paid (not $1000 less taxes, rent, etc. as in the States).

The majority of non-National Team level rookies signing straight out of college earn between $500-$1200/month, with standouts maybe getting up to $3000/month.

9. In addition to my salary, what else will be provided for in a professional contract?2017-10-27T17:47:51+02:00

Typical European contracts include provisions for a furnished apartment (usually to be shared with another foreign player on the team), one roundtrip airline ticket (to Europe at the beginning of the season and back to the States at the end of the season), health insurance, and sometimes the shared use of a car. Higher-profile contracts can include airfare home to the States at Christmas, language tutors, mobile phone usage, and daily meals provided by a local sponsoring restaurant. Keep in mind that every situation is different every year, so there are no guarantees.

10. What are the implications of the worldwide economy and European Union (EU) tax immigration laws?2017-10-27T17:47:14+02:00

In recent years the added tax burden from current EU laws has made it more difficult for teams to match the salary expectations of top-level players. As a result, player salaries are decreasing throughout Europe and in some cases players may have to work a side job in order to obtain the necessary visa to permit them to live in the country as a foreigner. Foreign players are also more expensive to contract than local players and teams simply cannot afford to pay for a foreign player unless they make the team better.

11. What happens if I get injured?2017-10-27T17:46:32+02:00

Most professional contracts include some type of formal health insurance. BIP highly recommends having some type of emergency insurance provider in the States as a back-up as well. If your injury is minor, local doctors, physical therapists, and athletic trainers will be equipped to treat you. Major injuries can also be treated in Europe, however most American athletes typically prefer to return to the States if their injury requires surgery. In the event of a season-ending injury, most teams terminate your playing contract to pursue a healthy player in your place.

12. What happens if the team fails to pay my salary?2017-10-27T17:45:54+02:00

Unfortunately, it is not unheard of for a team to default on a player salary payment. This is another benefit of signing with BIP. We have developed an extensive network of professional team contacts across the world and has placed players in 40+ different countries on 5 continents. Most, if not all, of our client placements are on teams that have already established a relationship with us. We work mostly with teams that we know from experience can and will pay their contracted players in full.

However, we cannot guarantee that professional team will not default on their payment. In the event of such an incident, we of course intervene on your behalf. In a case where we might deal with a new team or a team with a questionable reputation, we require the team to pay 1-3 months¹ salary in advance. By forcing the club to show their financial commitment and pay up front. We have been very successful at ensuring timely pay.

13. Is there any chance that the professional team will cut me?2017-10-27T17:45:15+02:00

As with any job, if you do not perform to the desired expectations, it is possible that you may be released without pay. However, such a scenario is highly unlikely, especially if you were on an Exposure Tour and the team was able to watch you play prior to the signing of your contract. Most teams do not release players until the completion of the first half of the season in December, but again it is not likely to happen if you are trying hard and performing to the best of your capabilities.

It is also important to understand that in Europe your role as a professional foreign player extends beyond the court. Endearing yourself to the team, the sponsors and community fan base will improve your chances of retaining your contract and getting future contract offers.

14. What if I break my playing contract?2017-10-27T17:44:31+02:00

We understand that emergencies happen in life and sometimes there’s just nothing you can do. However, it’s also important for players to understand that it teams have player add-on deadlines and pay high international transfer fees to get foreign players on their team. Breaking a contract after you have already signed and committed can literally destroy a team’s entire season if they are unable to replace you. It also does not reflect well on you as an athlete, BIP as a company, or on American players in general.

It’s also important to understand that if you break your contract, it will be at your own expense. No professional teams will pay your way home if you break your contract and want to leave early for any reason.

If you aren’t sure whether you can handle Europe for an extended period, then we strongly recommend attending one of our Exposure Tours. They are designed to help players determine if they can and want to commit to playing professional volleyball in Europe for the length of a season.

It’s important to note that teams spend between $5000-$10,000 to hire a foreign player, and they must pay this before an athlete plays in an official match. This means that IF an athlete quits, the club could ask the athlete to pay some of this back. More and more clubs are putting clauses in contracts to ensure that players don’t quit without taking on some financial obligation to cover money wasted on transfer fees, visa fees, or expensive airfare.

Note: An athlete recently signed in Peru. The club paid the following prior to her arrival:

  • FIVB Transfer Fee (non-refundable): 2000 CHF = ~$2000
  • USA Volleyball Transfer Fee (non-refundable): $500
  • Residence Permits in Peru (non-refundable): ~$600
  • Round-Trip Airfare (non-refundable): ~$1300
  • Local Health Insurance Annual Premium: ~$900

The player arrived, quit within the week, and the team was out $5300, even though they never had to pay her a penny of salary. In the future, the club wants to have a clause in all contracts to demand this money be returned if a player quits. Something to think about before you sign a contract.

15. Can my partner come to Europe and live with me throughout the season?2017-10-27T17:42:42+02:00

This is not a simple yes or no answer. Great players playing on great teams in the most competitive countries have much more bargaining power for such accommodations. For second tier players, wanting your partner along usually counts as a strike against you in potential contract negotiations. By and large, most clubs in Europe would prefer individuals rather than couples because apartments are usually shared amongst foreign players and partners add additional costs for the club. As with anything, however, there are exceptions.

16. Can I have friends or family visit me?2017-10-27T17:41:18+02:00

Yes, of course however all the travel details of visits should be coordinated with your team. Also keep in mind that you will still be required to attend all practices even despite having visitors from the States.

17. How does the banking work for my paychecks?2017-10-27T17:40:46+02:00

If you get a job in Europe, you will probably need to set up a bank account with a foreign bank near to where you will be living. This European bank account can be linked to a U.S. bank account at a later date. They work more or less the same way as an American bank. Your club will assist you with this.

18. What type of questions should I be asking of my agent or potential coach?2017-10-27T17:39:46+02:00

The most important questions should revolve around living situation in the city where the team trains and competes. Your living situation will have a big impact on how happy you are during the season. Other important questions include asking about the teammates you are playing with, whether there are other foreign players on the roster, if the club has hosted foreigners in the past (to get in contact with past American players) and what other activities you can do during your season besides just playing volleyball. Many teams have their players coach youth teams or work for the club in some other way get them involved in the community and help players earn additional income.

Social media matters.  We encourage players to be mindful of what you post on your social media profile.  Teams research the internet and it’s very common for teams to back out on offers due to pictures or videos found online. You’re being paid to play volleyball and publicly represent a professional, therefore you need to act, behave, and treat your body like a professional athlete.

1. What is included in a foreign volleyball tour managed by Bring It Promotions?2017-10-27T17:30:16+02:00

BIP turns your organizational nightmare into one of the easiest and most rewarding trips you will ever take. Your all-inclusive tour means that we handle all logistics once you arrive, so you don’t have to. All BIP foreign tours include: hotel accommodations, three meals a day, unlimited matches and training sessions, ground transportation overseas, daily sightseeing and activities in each city. We handle every aspect for your foreign tour except for airfare (unless requested).

2. Why should we use Bring It Promotions rather than employ another tour management company?2017-10-27T17:29:42+02:00

Bring It Promotions has been hosting volleyball tours and helping players connect with foreign club teams in Europe since 1996. We have a vast network of connections to national volleyball federations, teams, and service providers. We’re also a dedicated volleyball agency. All of our tour guides have played volleyball. Other tour management companies do not have the same appreciation for the specific needs of volleyball teams and coaches, nor the same access to national teams or European professional teams.

3. Do you have a list of the coaches who have previously used BIP for their tour management so that I can gather references first?2017-10-27T17:29:05+02:00

Yes! You can view a selection of coaches testimonials here. We strongly encourage you to ask around the volleyball community. You can also review a complete list of teams from past years.

4. What time of year can my team take a foreign tour?2017-10-27T17:26:02+02:00

BIP will host your foreign tour anytime of the year including major holidays. If you are a university team then we recommend that you check with your university compliance advisor to ensure legality of your preferred travel dates. Otherwise, the timing of your trip is entirely up to you.

5. How far in advance do we need to contract Bring It Promotions to manage the trip?2017-10-27T17:25:14+02:00

We suggest that you contact BIP at least 6 months to 1 year in advance in order to secure preferred travel dates and allow sufficient time for fundraising. Airfare is often the largest variable on price for teams, so having group airfare locked in 300+ days prior to tour can be a big saver. We’re happy to set up last-minute trips when needed as well of course.

6. Do you provide travel insurance?2017-10-27T17:24:22+02:00

We do not and cannot provide travel insurance. However we strongly recommend travel insurance for all participants in accordance with our insurance company. It’s often affordable and certainly worth it if there are any issues with the trip or baggage associated with the trip.

7. Can we customize our volleyball tour?2017-10-27T17:22:48+02:00

Yes, of course! All of our tours are completely customized. We have established relationships with teams throughout Europe, South America & Central America, Australia and the South Pacific and Asia. We will arrange matches virtually anywhere you want to go. We have countries that we recommend and are worthwhile from competition, sightseeing, and recruiting standpoints, but you are free to make requests based on your own individual preferences. The number of places you can go is limited only by the amount of time you plan to spend overseas and the amount of money budgeted for the trip.

8. What is the average cost of a Bring It Promotions University Tour?2017-10-27T17:20:54+02:00

The cost of any University Tour is entirely dependent upon the number of people in your travel party, the number of days you plan on touring, the number of countries you’d like to see, and the time of year you plan to travel.

Tours in Nicaragua start at $795 per person. China, Brazil and Argentina start at $1995 per person. Most European tours average $2,100+ per person plus. Prices listed do not include airfare and country visas (when needed). Remember, while Bring It Promotions can give you a quote up front, we can also work within almost any budget you present to us.

Starting in 2017, BIP started offering “Diamond Tours” to universities with the budget for a more exclusive experience. The Diamond Tour concept is to offer a tour package more in line with what women’s basketball teams have been paying for years, with upgraded hotels, larger per-diems on days when we provide local currency for “own meals”, and some special activities and upgrades to further customize the tour experience for teams interested in a more “luxe” experience.

9. How do we go about paying Bring It Promotions for our University Tour?2017-10-27T17:17:42+02:00

We require a deposit (usually between $5,000 to $10,000 depending on the tour) to secure your desired tour dates. After your down payment has been made and your dates have been locked in, the balance will be due before you depart for your tour. We generally ask for tours to be paid in full 60 days prior to departure. Exact details will be included in your initial invoice. University-issued checks are the most standard form of payment but we can accept credit cards if you’re willing to pay the 3% fee. In the event that your travel party includes family members or boosters who will not be covered by the university for their trip costs, we will deal with them directly and bill them separately. We offer special “Booster Packages” when requested to make having family or boosters on the trip without adding liability or extra work for the institution or coaching staff.

10. What level is the competition?2017-10-27T17:17:05+02:00

We can accommodate every level of volleyball from youth club teams to DI, DII, DIII and Collegiate National Team. We can organize matches against top-level professional teams, National or Junior National teams in almost any country.

11. How often will my team play?2017-10-27T17:16:16+02:00

You can determine the frequency of play and practice sessions. We typically schedule a match every 2-3 days. We will not include practice sessions on tour unless you specifically request it. The amount of volleyball is entirely up to you.

12. What type of accommodations should we expect?2017-10-27T17:15:39+02:00

Our standard quality lodging is 3-4 stars depending on location. Lodging throughout the tour will depend entirely on your budget. In the past we have used hotels, sport lodges, pensions, hostels, and even gymnasiums themselves. Regardless of the lodging you choose, sometimes the least expensive accommodations turn into the best cultural experiences. In general the quality of the lodging may vary from city to city as some places give you more for less.

13. What type of meals will we be having?2017-10-27T17:14:52+02:00

Just as is the case with accommodations, meals will in large part depend on your budget, as well as the daily schedule of the tour. Sometimes meals have to be fast as we go from sightseeing to a competition or from city to city; other times we can afford to sit down and take our time. But by and large, meals will be held in restaurants, most of which we have already used on previous tours. The food ranges from pasta and pizza to more traditional local foods. In some cases a pre-determined menu with, say, four possible choices will be given. In other cases the restaurant has pre-prepared meals (such as large pasta dinners). And, of course, there are times where you will be free to choose off the restaurant menu or given per diem for meals on your own. We can accommodate most dietary restrictions if you let us know in advance of your arrival. Keep in mind that in most places we travel, there are grocery stores, convenience stores, and American style fast food options throughout Europe.

14. Will a member of the Bring It Promotions staff be on tour with us at all times?2017-10-27T17:14:10+02:00

Yes. We will never run a tour without a member of Bring It Promotions along to ensure that the itinerary is followed and everything is running smoothly.

15. Are we permitted to bring family, friends of the program, or university administrators on our Tour with us?2017-10-27T17:12:19+02:00

Yes. Bringing family, boosters, or administrators along is common and of course we will simply include them in the number of your travel party. However, it is imperative that all non-volleyball participants understand up front that volleyball, and the team in particular, is the priority. We offer special “Booster Packages” upon request.

Can BIP help my team recruit a foreign player to the United States?2017-10-27T17:09:00+02:00

This is a complicated question these days. From 2000 to 2003 we ran an International Recruiting Service and helped about 100 foreign girls get scholarships in the USA during that time. We tried our best to run the service in a fair way for all coaches, but with stricter NCAA regulations popping up, the prevalence of information on the internet (and the advent of Google) and our friendships with several coaches in the NCAA ranks, it became too difficult to keep up with demand and also contain the conflicts of interest that constantly plagued our little business. We also just don’t have the time to check the “legality” of every girl as well as we once could.

At this point in time we still spend over 200 days a year on tour and watching volleyball matches across the world. Many of the teams that we visit or see have good players in the age range of 15-20, and some of these players do speak English. In some cases they are 100% “legal” and in some cases they are less so. Some are “pros”, some have played with “pros”, and some are 100% amateur. Some are interested in playing in the USA, and many have no idea that the possibility exists.

The problem lies in the fact that we just don’t have the time or inclination to find out who is who anymore, and unless they actively pursue us for information about going to the USA, this “resource” goes untapped by us. Therefore, the best way for us to assist coaches in finding foreign players is to have them on tour with us meeting these players and their coaches and/or managers to set up relationships for the future as well.

Is this the right option for me to take where I am in my life?2016-11-08T20:00:24+02:00

So many questions to ask yourself here: 4 big questions with 4 sample Answers below:

1- Do you want to live in another country?

2- What are you willing to accept if you going to survive here on volleyball?

3-Can I do it without the immediate support of my friends, family, significant other, athletic trainer, english speaking coach or state of the art facility?

4- Am I willing to accept that I may not get a contract and have a backup plan back home?

If your answers resemble something like this, then this is a good choice for you:

1- YES, I want to live like a local while earning money as an athlete.

2- YES, is anything as long as I’m safe, happy and independent I will work hard for this life experience (this could include tutoring, coaching youth, working for the club etc. )

3- I love What’s App, Skype and Google.

4- If it’s meant to be it will be. This is an opportunity for a job. Like all job “interviews” you may not be made an offer.

What should I expect from practice/ matches during the tour?2016-11-11T16:04:54+02:00

During the tour you will have 2 volleyball sessions most days. One may be a practice and one session a match against a local European team. You will learn to warm up in the European style, be coaches by a European coach and train with other Americans, Canadians or other Bring It clients.

Why should I list more than one positions? When during the tour should I change position to show off my talent?2016-11-08T19:59:22+02:00

We want to market you the best we can. So if you can list a secondary position that you are solid in, it will make you more appealing for multiple teams. This tour is not the time to “tryout” another position that you haven’t played since high school.

Options for positions are as follows:

Opposite (play all the way around to hit out of backrow)

Middle hitter (must be able to serve)

Outside hitter (play 6 rotations)

Setter

Libero (No such thing as DS in international play…very difficult to place liberos)

How do I pack for a trip that could last 10 days, 3 weeks or 8 months?2016-11-08T19:58:57+02:00

Best advice I can give is take only what you can carry through the airport by yourself regardless of how long you stay. You will buy things here. You will take things home at the holidays and bring different things back…most U.S. products you can get here and you will definitely find new ones you like more and can’t find in America!

Somethings the girls wished they would have packed:
• Blister band aids
• More warm clothes (it is cooler than you think in Slovenia/Northern Europe)
• Shoes for sightseeing/hiking

Can I travel before or after the tour?2016-11-08T19:58:34+02:00

YES! Itinerary is up to you before or after a tour. Athletes have received contract offers well after the tour ends so staying a week or two to travel on your own could be helpful. BIP does not plan or pay for any additional travel outside of the Firesale tour dates. Families or friends can not come on the BIP tour dates with you so you can focus on the objective; getting a contract!

How much money should I bring on tour?2016-11-08T19:58:09+02:00

Most countries we travel in on tour operate on the currency of Euros (insert symbol here). The best way to get Euros is to bring a debit or credit card that doesn’t charge you to use it in Europe or has no ATM withdrawal fees. Use the ATM machine at the airport or any bank you see to get some cash out. Europe functions on a lot of cash transactions. Paying 1 euro for a latte with a credit card is annoying to most shop owners who have to pay a percentage to the bank if you use the machine. On the flip side, don’t bring a ton of american dollars to exchange. The fees are outrageous and if you get pick pocketed that money is gone forever. At least with an ATM card, the bank may help retrieve any fraud charges.

What happens if I get a contract?2016-11-08T19:57:43+02:00

Your agent will guide you through this process, so you need to trust their advice. They are your liaison for getting the most out of an offer and have your best interest at heart. Trust their experience.

If you get an offer, you agent will contact you, tell you all details and YOU make the decision on whether you want to take the contract or not. They have already negotiated the best deal for you so there usually isn’t much wiggle room once a contract is offered. Discussing the offer with a family or friend is allowed, but this is YOUR future. As an adult, you have control over your decisions. If you came here for the right reasons, trust your gut when making a decision on an offer.

If you accept an offer, you will leave the tour pretty quickly to join the signing team in their city. The team will provide transportation for you to leave the tour. They will also provide all room and board for the remainder of the tour and until the terms of your contract start.

How does the banking work for my paychecks?2016-11-08T19:57:16+02:00

If you get a job in Europe, you will probably need to set up a bank account with a foreign bank near to where you will be living. This European bank account can be linked to a U.S. bank account at a later date. They work more or less the same way as an American bank.

What type of questions should I be asking of my agent or potential coach?2016-11-08T19:56:49+02:00

General questions for you should revolve around living in the city where the team trains and competes. Other questions can be about the teammates you are playing with, other foreign players on the roster or what else you may be doing for the club besides just playing. Teams have their players coach youth teams or work for the club in some other way.

I’m sold! When should I submit my deposit?2016-11-08T19:56:19+02:00

When you are ready to commit to the January tour, send your deposit to:

Bring It Promotions

Attn: Kelly, JEET ’17

7055 Scripps Crescent

Goleta, CA 93117

Please be SURE that your name and “JEET ’17” appear on the check.

This deposit goes towards the total cost of the tour. After you send your deposit, BOOK A FLIGHT to Europe. You make all your own travel arrangements to get to the first stop on the tour. BIP does not help you get to or home from the tour.  A lot of girls pay for the tour out of pocket, but we have had many girls set up a “GoFundMe” account or found sponsors through their alma mater booster club.

Can BIP help me recruit foreign athletes for my university team?2016-04-15T05:26:56+02:00

Tough question these days. We ran an International Recruiting Service from 2000 to 2003 and helped about 100 girls get scholarships in the USA during that time. We tried our best to run the service in a fair way for all coaches, but with stricter NCAA regulations popping up, the prevalence of information on the internet (and the advent of google.com) and our friendships with several coaches in the NCAA ranks, it became too difficult to keep up with demand and also contain the conflicts of interest that constantly plagued our little business. We also just don’t have the time to check the “legality” of every girl as well as we once could. At this point in time both Cory and Tim still spend between 100-150 days a year on tour and/or watching volleyball matches in Europe and Central/South America. Many of the teams that we visit or see have good players in the age range of 15-20, and some of these players do speak English. In some cases they are 100% “legal” and in some cases they are less so. Some are “pros”, some have played with “pros”, and some are 100% amateur. Some are interested in playing in the USA, and many have no idea that the possibility exists. The problem lies in the fact that we just don’t have the time or inclination to find who is who anymore, and unless they actively pursue us for information about going to the USA, this “resource” goes untapped by us. Therefore, the best way for us to assist coaches in finding foreign players is to have them ON TOUR with us meeting these players and their coaches and/or managers to set up relationships for the future as well. Please see our Tours Section on this site for more information about the tours.

Do you have a list of the coaches who have previously used BIP for their tour management so that I can gather references first?2014-04-10T06:07:31+02:00

We invite you to ask around first. The following is just a short list of the many coaches that have been on previous BIP Team Tours: Joe Sagula (North Carolina), Debbie Brown (Notre Dame), Devin Scruggs (Reno), Brian Gimmillaro (Long Beach State), Andy Banachowski (UCLA), Al Scates (UCLA men), Reed Sunahara (Cincinnati), Russ Rose (Penn State), Mary Wise (Florida), Jerritt Elliott (Texas), Tom Hilbert (Colorado State), and Dietre Collins (Cornel). Additionally, journal entries from previous Tours can be found on our website at http://bringitusa.com/tours/calendar/, as well as links to university websites for their respective tour information.

How do we go about paying Bring It Promotions for our University Tour?2016-02-18T09:03:46+02:00

We require a deposit (usually $5,000 or $10,000) to secure your desired tour dates. After your down payment has been made and your dates have been locked in, the balance will be due before you depart for your tour. We generally ask for tours to be paid in full 60 days prior to departure. Exact details will be included in your initial invoice. University-issued checks are the most standard form of payment but we can accept credit cards if you’re willing to pay the 3% fee. In the event that your travel party includes family members or outside friends who will not be covered by the university for their trip costs, we will deal with them directly and have them on a special “Booster Package” with BIP. Please contact Tim or Cory if you have any questions about this.

What is the average cost of a Bring It Promotions University Tour?2016-11-11T16:04:54+02:00

The cost of any University Tour is entirely dependent upon the number of people in your travel party, the number of days you plan on touring, the number of countries you’d like to see, and the time of year you plan to travel. Costs can range from $1200 to $3000+ per person, not including airfare. (Airfare usually ranges between $500 and $1200 depending on the time of year.) Remember, while Bring It Promotions can give you a quote up front, we can also work within any budget you present to us.

Are we permitted to bring family, friends of the program, or university administrators on our Tour with us?2014-04-10T06:04:01+02:00

Yes. Bringing family, boosters, or administrators along is common and of course we will simply include them in the number of your travel party. However, it is imperative that all non-volleyball participants understand up front that volleyball, and the team in particular, is the priority.

How good will the competition be and how often will we play?2014-04-10T06:03:28+02:00

You can pre-determine your desired level of competition. If you are a strong team and would like to play against some of the top professional or National Teams, we can arrange for high caliber matches. If you are not a strong team and would rather play mid-level matches, we can also accommodate you. In addition, you may determine the frequency of play and practice sessions. Previous tours have ranged from nightly matches to matches every couple of nights. Some coaches wish to have practice sessions on their own, some don’t. It’s entirely up to you.

What type of meals will we be having?2014-04-10T06:02:47+02:00

Just as is the case with accommodations, meals will in large part depend on your budget, as well as the daily schedule of the tour. Sometimes meals have to be fast as we go from sightseeing to a competition or from city to city; other times we can afford to sit down and take our time. But by and large, meals will be held in restaurants, most of which we have already used on previous tours. The food ranges from pasta and pizza to more traditional local foods. In some cases a pre-determined menu with, say, four possible choices will be given. In other cases the restaurant has pre-prepared meals (such as large pasta dinners). And, of course, there are times where you will be free to choose off the restaurant menu or given per diem for meals on your own. If you have extremely picky eaters in your group, there are grocery stores, convenience stores, and McDonald’s throughout Europe.

What type of accommodations should we expect?2014-04-10T06:02:29+02:00

Lodging throughout the tour will depend entirely on your budget. In the past we have used hotels, sport lodges, pensions, hostels, and even gymnasiums themselves. Regardless of the lodging you choose, sometimes the least expensive accommodations turn into the best cultural experiences. In general the quality of the lodging may vary from city to city as some places give you more for less.

Will a member of the Bring It Promotions staff be on tour with us at all times?2014-04-10T06:02:12+02:00

Yes. We will never run a tour without a member of Bring It Promotions along to ensure that the itinerary is followed and everything is running smoothly.

What time of year can we take our University Tour and how far in advance do we need to contract Bring It Promotions to manage the trip?2014-04-10T06:01:53+02:00

Your University Tour can be taken anytime throughout the year as long as you are not in school, and as long as you’re back from your tour 30 days before your first practice date of your season. Check with BIP or your compliance advisor if you have any questions about these dates. Otherwise, the timing of your trip is entirely up to you. We suggest not only from our standpoint, but also from your program’s fundraising standpoint, that you contract BIP at least 3-6 months in advance of your desired trip to receive an early price quote. Securing BIP as your tour management company well in advance of the trip also locks in your preferred trip dates.

Are there specific countries we visit, or can we customize our trip?2016-11-11T16:04:54+02:00

Customize, of course! We have established relationships with teams throughout Europe, South & Central America, Australia and the South Pacific, Asia and the entire volleyball world, and can arrange matches virtually anywhere you want to go. We have countries that we recommend and are worthwhile from competition, sightseeing, and recruiting standpoints, but you are free to make requests based on your own individual preferences. The number of places you can go is limited only by the amount of time you plan to spend overseas and the amount of money budgeted for the trip.

Why should we use Bring It Promotions rather than organize our own tour or employ another tour management company?2014-04-10T06:01:14+02:00

First of all, Bring It Promotions is based in Europe and has been since 1997. Because of that, we have a vast network of connections to federations, teams, and service industries. Secondly, BIP deals solely with volleyball. Other tour management companies do not have the same appreciation for the specific needs of volleyball teams and coaches, nor the same access to National Teams or European professional teams. Thirdly, BIP turns your organizational nightmare into one of the easiest and most rewarding road trips you will ever take. Your all-inclusive tour means that we handle all logistics once you arrive in so you don’t have to.

What is included in a University Tour managed by Bring It Promotions?2014-04-10T06:00:51+02:00

Bring It Promotions handles every aspect of your European tour except, in most cases, airfare. At your specific request we will agree to organize your airfare, but we have found through experience that most schools prefer to arrange their own air transportation. All Bring It Promotions University Tours include: all hotel accommodations, all meals/per diem, unlimited matches/training sessions, all ground transportation overseas, and team sightseeing arrangements and fees.

I’m sold! I’m ready to join an Exposure Tour. How do I go about signing up?2014-04-10T05:56:55+02:00

Signing up for an Exposure Tour is simple. Please just send an email to Tim Kelly with as much information about yourself as possible. We’ll need to know your height, birth date, position played, experience, and we’d like to know about any direct links to info, bios, or video of you online. You can also visit our website for complete details and the most updated information.

Does participating on a tour obligate me to sign a professional contract or use Bring It Promotions as an agency?2014-04-10T05:56:32+02:00

Participating on an Exposure Tour team does not, in any way, obligate you to tryout for a professional team nor to accept a professional team’s contract offer. At the very least, the Exposure Tours are guaranteed to be one of the most fun and memorable trips of your life. The Tours are a chance to see Europe, play highly competitive volleyball, and build lasting memories with other top collegiate players. You may initially join a Tour not wanting to play overseas, but later change your mind after being on Tour. Or you may join a Tour with the aspiration of landing a pro contract and subsequently decide otherwise. Either way, the Tours are a rewarding experience regardless of your final interest level in playing in Europe. Participating on an Exposure Tour team only requires you to use Bring It Promotions if you decide to accept a professional tryout or playing contract.

Who coaches the Exposure Tour teams?2014-04-10T05:56:10+02:00

In the past, Exposure Tour teams have been coached by international coaches and U.S. collegiate coaches, including National Team coaches from Slovenia and Norway, Portugese FIVB instructor, Paulo Cunha, USA National Team assistant coach, Kevin Hambly, and UNLV head coach and former Olympian, Deitre Collins. Cory Solomon, Recruiting Coordinator for Bring It Promotions and former University of Utah assistant coach, has also been on hand for previous Exposure Tour coaching responsibilities. On any given tour, there may also be several U.S. collegiate coaches with you, so there will be no shortage of high-quality coaching. The added benefit of having international coaches involved with your Exposure Tour is the connection you will have to numerous other professional clubs in Europe. For example, having a Portugese FIVB instructor on your tour can equate to more professional playing opportunities—in Portugal and elsewhere—at the conclusion of your Exposure Tour.

When do the tours take place?2016-11-11T16:04:54+02:00

Recently we have been running 2 Women’s Exposure Tours and 1 Men’s Exposure Tours annually. The tentative tour schedule can be found on our Exposure Tour page. Note that this will likely be the same schedule for future years.

How long are the tours?2014-04-10T05:54:29+02:00

Exposure Tours typically last 11 days/10 nights, again depending on the countries and the number of matches played.

How much does an Exposure Tour cost and what does that cost include?2016-11-11T16:04:54+02:00

Exposure Tours range in cost from $1200 to $1750 USD, depending on the countries, time of year, and amount of travel. The price is all-inclusive (sometimes excluding lunch) other than airfare from your desired city of origin. The price includes hotel accommodations, meals, and all bus transportation upon arrival in Europe. You are only required to bring money for personal gifts, telephone calls/internet cafe access, and some sightseeing options.

What does a typical tour consist of?2014-04-10T05:53:49+02:00

Exposure Tours are designed, as the name suggests, to expose players to European professional volleyball. Throughout the Tour, the team will compete almost every night against some of the top professional teams available in the countries included in the tour. There will, of course, be plenty of sightseeing opportunities and fun to be had as well. Journals from previous tours are available on our website and we highly encourage you to read through them for a better understanding of Exposure Tours in general.

Is it necessary for me to go on an Exposure Tour in order to be represented by Bring It Promotions?2014-04-10T05:53:32+02:00

For non-USA National Team, collegiate 1st Team All-Americans, or top USA development pipeline players, coming on an Exposure Tour is 99.9% necessary to prove your level of play and more importantly, your commitment to the potential of living overseas. As noted previously, those players who have participated on an Exposure or University Tour will be given priority with all professional team tryouts and contracts that become available.

I keep hearing about new European tax and immigration laws. Is it really that much harder to get a job now than a few years ago?2014-04-10T05:52:04+02:00

Unfortunately, yes. With the European Union tightening its belt in regards to foreign workers, and a rough economy, it is getting harder and harder each year to place lower and mid-level players on teams. Teams simply can not afford someone unless they make the team better. Also, with an added tax burden from current EU laws, teams are also having a difficult time matching salary expectations for top level players. What this means is that players have to search harder to find a team, and often work a side job just to the get the necessary visa to stay in the country and play. Salaries are lower than just 2-3 years ago, and the average rookie player may not be able to find a job at all.

What happens if I get injured?2014-04-10T05:51:46+02:00

Your professional contract normally includes some type of formal health insurance. Bring It Promotions highly recommends having some type of emergency insurance provider in the States as a back-up as well. If your injury is minor, local doctors, physical therapists, and athletic trainers will be equipped to treat you. Major injuries can also be treated in Europe, though most athletes typically return to the States if their injury requires surgery. In the event of a season-ending injury, most teams terminate your playing contract to pursue a healthy player in your place.

I have heard rumors that some professional teams don’t pay and the player is left without their contracted salary. What happens if the team stops paying me or defaults on my salary?2016-11-11T16:04:54+02:00

Bring It Promotions has developed an extensive network of professional team contacts across the world and has placed players in 40+ different countries on 5 continents. Most, if not all, of our client placements are on teams that have already established a relationship with us. Although anything can happen, the situation is unlikely to occur. In the event of such an incident, Bring It Promotions would of course intervene on your behalf. In a case where we might deal with a new team or a team with a questionable reputation, we require the team to pay 1-3 months¹ salary in advance. By forcing the club to show their financial commitment and pay up front, we have been very successful at ensuring timely pay. It is a great benefit to you that our company is located in Europe because it increases our accessibility to you (and the team you play for) in both good and bad situations.

Is there any chance that the professional team will cut me?2014-04-10T05:50:59+02:00

As with any job, if you do not perform you can be released without pay. However, such a scenario is highly unlikely, especially if you were on an Exposure Tour and the team had the chance to see you play prior to the signing of your contract. Most teams do not release players until the completion of the first half of the season (December), but again it is not likely to happen if you are performing to your capabilities. One piece of advice is to spend time endearing yourself to the team and public. By doing so, even medium level players can be kept on contract—despite deficient play—just because the club and people like you, see that you have assimilated to your environment, and know that you have something to offer the team chemistry.

What if a situation comes up where I am compelled to break my playing contract?2016-11-11T16:04:54+02:00

Breaking a foreign contract is not a good reflection on your as a person, Bring It Promotions as a company, nor on American players in general. That’s why it is important to participate on a Bring It Promotions Exposure Tour first so you can determine whether you could handle living in Europe for the duration of a professional season (usually 8 months). Breaking a contract after you have already signed and committed leaves the team in an urgent and binding position. Leaving early is also at your expense. That is to say, no professional teams will pay your way home if you break your contract and want to leave early. If you aren’t sure whether or not you could handle Europe for an extended period of time, why not check it out first-hand on an Exposure Tour first or make arrangements through Bring It Promotions to fly over for multiple individual tryouts?

What if I am married? Can my husband/wife come to Europe and live with me throughout the season?2014-04-10T05:49:55+02:00

Yes and no. Great players playing on great teams in the most competitive countries have much more bargaining power for such accommodations. For second tier players, wanting your spouse along usually counts as a strike against you in potential contract negotiations. By and large, most clubs in Europe would prefer individuals rather than couples because apartments are usually shared amongst foreign players and husbands/wives add additional costs for the club. As with anything, however, there are exceptions.

Can I have friends or family visit me?2014-04-10T05:49:23+02:00

Of course, but the details of visits should always be coordinated with your team. Be aware, also, that despite having visitors from the States, you will still be required to be at all practice sessions and competitions.

What happens if I want to terminate my agent/client agreement with Bring It Promotions?2016-11-11T16:04:54+02:00

Bring It Promotions strives to give quality, personalized representation to all clients in their respective situations. If a client has been misrepresented in any way or is unsatisfied with Bring It Promotions, we will release you from your agent/client agreement.

How good is European professional volleyball?2014-04-10T05:44:53+02:00

It should first be noted that the highest levels of professional volleyball are not exclusive to Western Europe. In fact, Korea, Japan, and Brazil have some of the best (and highest paying) teams in the world. China is also hiring foreign players now, and the top teams have a lot of money. Within Europe, Italy is still generally considered the top league (top to bottom) for both men and women, but not by much. And there is certainly more money to be made in other, arguably less desirable countries. Russia, Poland, Azerbijan, and Turkey are good (and often very high-paying) leagues for both men and women, while Greece is strong (money and level) for men much more so than for the women. Other European Cup teams from the most competitive counties can be on par with these tops teams as well, but the reality is that teams and leagues can change in level (financial and volleyball-wise) pretty quickly these days. The second tier of European teams includes France, Spain, Germany, and Italy A2 but the top teams from these countries might compete at the highest level on any given year. There are also leagues or short term playing opportunities, often with different time frames for their seasons, in places like Indonesia, Puerto Rico, certain Arab Countries (UAE, Kuwait, Qatar, etc), Argentina, Chile, and even the Maldives. Level, compensation, and time of year really vary year to year with these countries, so please be in touch with us if you have any specific questions. On the women’s side, Puerto Rico has become the ideal “transition league” for NCAA stars as the teams sign just as the NCAA season ends and the league runs from January to May. The money is very good as well; most of the players that sign make three to four times more salary than they would in Europe, and without having to travel so far.

I keep hearing about the European Cups: Champions League, CEV Cup, and CEV Challenge Cup. What are these? Is it important for me to play on one of these teams?2014-04-10T05:44:59+02:00

Champions League, CEV Cup, and CEV Challenge Cup are international, cream-of-the-crop tournaments. Basically, some of the teams in the top countries play in multi-country playoffs to determine the best teams in all of Europe for any given year. Champions League is the highest level tournament; it consists of the top team from most of the top countries. CEV Cup and CEV Challenge Cup are separate tournaments which usually consist of the second to fourth or fifth place teams from the top countries. Some wealthier, more competitive teams from second tier countries also travel to play in these tournaments if they qualify. Yes, it is always best to play on the highest level European Cup team that you can. Playing on such teams increases your exposure to the highest levels of play and increases your stock for future seasons. Landing spots on European Cup teams can be challenging, even for National Team members, collegiate All-Americans, or National Team development players, but is more beneficial from a competition and financial standpoint.

Is the level of intensity and training in Europe a huge jump from the U.S. university system?2014-04-10T05:45:03+02:00

Going to Europe is not necessarily a vertical step from college. European professional teams are not structured the same, are often less organized, and have less money and fewer resources than most U.S. universities. Depending on where you go and who you play for, the training may or may not be as strenuous as your collegiate training. Suffice it to say, however, that if you play on a Champions League, Top Teams Cup, or CEV team, the level of intensity will at least match the level of intensity of any top U.S. school. And remember, although the training may not always be as intense, the caliber of players is unquestionably higher.

What is a typical practice/playing schedule?2014-04-10T05:45:09+02:00

The number of times you practice in any given week depends on the country, the team, and the division in which you play. Many highly competitive European teams practice twice a day and compete at least once each weekend. Other mid- to lower-level teams practice three to four times each week and compete once on the weekends.

How much can I make playing in Europe?2014-04-10T05:45:27+02:00

Your salary depends on your skill level, where you play, and the financial capabilities of the team you play for. Professional contracts can range from a few hundred U.S. dollars to $10,000+ each month. Some contracts also include signing bonuses and performance-based incentives packages for wins. It is important to keep in mind that, aside from the very best, world-class players, salaries have dropped as a whole from previous years. You may have to get used to the idea that your first year salary may be far lower than what your friends made in their first seasons a couple of years ago. On the upside, however, the money you make playing professionally in Europe is normally tax free, rent free, and insurance free, so if you are contracted to earn $1000USD per month, that’s exactly how much you will be paid (not $1000 less taxes, rent, etc. as in the States).

Aside from my salary, what else will be provided for in a professional contract?2014-04-10T05:45:33+02:00

Typical European contracts include provisions for a furnished apartment (usually to be shared with another foreign player on the team), one roundtrip airline ticket (to Europe at the beginning of the season and back to the States at the end of the season), health insurance, and sometimes the shared use of a car. Higher-profile contracts can include airfare home to the States at Christmas, language tutors, mobile phone usage, and daily meals provided by a local sponsoring restaurant. Keep in mind that every situation is different every year, so there are no guarantees.

What is the length of the season?2014-04-10T05:45:39+02:00

The typical European season begins sometime between August and October and ends sometime between March and May. The duration of your season depends entirely on the country, the team, and the playoff schedule for your particular league.

Will my coach and/or teammates speak English?2014-04-10T05:45:44+02:00

Not necessarily, but some do. Language tutors are also available in some cities. As part of the European assimilation process, you should want to learn at least the basics of the language that is spoken around you.

How many foreign players can play on a team, and what is the likelihood of another American playing with me?2014-04-10T05:45:48+02:00

Normally, two or three foreign players are permitted on any one team. There are countries, however, that have an unlimited number of foreign spots. Examples include: Austria, Holland, Germany & Switzerland. Spain can have 6 foreigners and Portugal, 5. The rules actually fluctuate every few years, and differ in each country, so please ask us if you have questions about a certain league. It is not uncommon to have two American players on one European professional team, and Bring It Promotions tries to place two Americans together whenever possible, but such a scenario is not guaranteed. In Puerto Rico, teams can have either two or three foreigners, depending on whether or not the team’s National Team players are currently with the club or playing for another team abroad.

If I use Bring It Promotions as my agency, how long am I committed to the company?2016-11-11T16:04:54+02:00

Our standard agent/client agreement is referred to as a “1+1.” If you sign a contract with a professional team, your agent/client agreement with Bring It Promotions automatically rolls over to include the following year.

I am not an American volleyball player, but am interested in having Bring It Promotions represent me. Does Bring It Promotions take on international clients?2014-04-09T05:47:36+02:00

Yes! Bring It Promotions has represented both male and female National Team and top-level players from 22 different countries. As is the case with USA National Team members, we can not only negotiate on your behalf with foreign contracts, but also with your home federation at your request.

I am a National Team member, a collegiate All-American, and/or I was involved with the National Team development pipeline. What can BIP do for me?2014-03-25T01:31:07+02:00

Bring it Promotions can find the best professional playing environment for you both financially and geographically to ensure that you are getting the most out of your foreign professional experience while competing at the highest possible level. We not only find you a team and negotiate on your behalf, but also remain accessible to you throughout your contract. Players of your caliber can earn significant amounts of money playing in foreign leagues and can be placed on good teams in competitive countries. In most cases you will be one of the premier players—if not the premier player—on your team. The workload and level of expectation is higher, of course, but there can be rewards for hard work. Additionally, National Team players can utilize Bring It Promotions even if you are not playing overseas. At your request, we can handle negotiations directly with the US Volleyball Federation on your behalf, keep you abreast of potential future deals in foreign countries, introduce you to some of the world’s top division coaches and team managers, and begin marketing you for the future. Finally, when foreign teams need short-term players (occasional two-week to one-month stints) to qualify for a tournament or to remain in their country’s top division, they are often willing to pay a decent salary for a “quick fix” player. Bring It Promotions will inform you of all such opportunities to earn extra money, especially when those scenarios arise during National Team off-seasons.

So how do I know if I need an agent?2014-03-25T01:31:02+02:00

There are two types of players that may need an agent: (1) National Team members, collegiate 1st Team All-Americans, and top National Team development pipeline players; or (2) Second-tier, “Best of the Rest” players.

What does it mean to be represented by Bring It Promotions?2016-11-11T16:04:54+02:00

Bring It Promotions is not a formal, cutthroat agency like you’d see in Jerry McGuire; we don’t actively solicit clients by calling all the time or sending fancy gifts. We don’t work that way because professional volleyball doesn’t work that way. Nonetheless, we are a full-service agency that matches players with teams, negotiates contracts, interacts with international federations, and, in some cases, seeks marketing/advertising opportunities for clients. In general, what we have to offer really just depends on who you are, what you’ve accomplished, or what you’re willing to do to earn a professional contract in a foreign country.

What is Bring It Promotions?2016-11-10T21:24:36+02:00

Bring It Promotions was founded in 1997 by Tim Kelly, a former UCLA All-American / NCAA Champion and five-year European professional veteran. Since its early days, the company has grown into a multi-faceted sports agency tour operator, and tournament organizer, placing over 100 players per year (men and women) in over 20 countries worldwide and running up to 40 tours and several tournaments annually across the globe. In 2001, Cory Solomon, a former University of Utah assistant coach, was added to the staff as Tours Director, but he actively participates with placements as well from his home in Maribor, Slovenia. We are fortunate to have former professional players Nick Ptaschinski, Director of the Women’s Agency, and Tony Westman, Director of the Men’s Agency, on board and living in Europe as well. For a more complete run-down on our staff, check out our team here.